Tue, Sep 15

POL 389-800, Security Studies
SUNY Oswego | Fall 2020
Dr. Craig Warkentin

Reading

  • Ch. 6, Social Constructivism (Agius, 74-90)

Goals

  • Articulate the main assumptions of constructivism
  • Explain how constructivism conceptualizes security
  • Describe constructivism's prescription(s) for security
  • Contrast constructivism to other covered approaches

Terms

  • agency-structure debate (75)
  • anarchy (75)
  • balance of power (83)
  • causality (78)
  • Cuban Missile Crisis (85)
  • dialogical (88)
  • endogenous (78)
  • exogenous (78)
  • genocide (86)
  • intersubjective (78)
  • neutrality (78)
  • Non-Proliferation Treaty (81)
  • norms (74)
  • power (76)
  • rationalism (84)
  • security dilemma (81)

Preliminaries

Questions (89)

  1. Why does identity matter to constructivists?
  2. What are norms and how do they affect security? How might norm change impact security, particularly in an era of populism?
  3. What is the difference between conventional and critical constructivism? Does it matter? If so, why?
  4. How do constructivists think about agents and structures?
  5. What is problematic about Wendtian constructivism?
  6. How do constructivists accounts of security questions, such as the persistence and expansion of NATO after the Cold War, differ from rationalist accounts?
  7. Is security always about identity?
  8. Do any of Wendt's three cultures of anarchy accurately reflect the international system today?
  9. What is beneficial and problematic about conventional constructivism's claim to build bridges between rationalist and reflectivist approaches?
  10. To what extent is culture important in terms of security?